Thanksgiving Malware

toxic malware report from UGNN Safenetting The cyber crime world seems to be heating up this season, from 400% increase in Android attacks to money-sucking cloud malware to the Twelve Scams of Christmas
* How far can foreign hackers go before Pentagon has to blow someone up?
* Microsoft seeks testers for limited beta of next-gen Security
* McAfee Warns Consumers of the “Twelve Scams of Christmas”
* DevilRobber now “improved”, still nasty malware threat
* Smart infrastructure plus malware equals disaster
* Hackers Make Malware Download Appear Legitimate
* DevilRobber Trojan now disguised as PixelMator
* Malware writer claims to hacked Windows 8
* Android malware explodes, jumps five-fold
* Avoiding the anti-malware trap
* Cloud: money-sucking parasite
. . . and more!


Microsoft seeks testers for limited beta of next-gen Security

Microsoft is seeking testers for the next release of its free Microsoft Security Essentials anti-malware/anti-virus product.
      The beta will be limited and is not yet available, but will be some time before the end of the year. There’s no word as to when the final version of the next release of MSE will be available.
READ THIS REPORT Full story : ZDNet (blog)


Hackers Make Malware Download Appear Legitimate

The creators of a recently-discovered form of malware (malicious software) have reportedly used stolen government ID to make the bogus software appear legitimate when presented on Windows PCs.
      Once the malware is installed, it can steal personal information, such as passwords or banking information, or download other malware programs to the PC.
READ THIS REPORT Full story : Infopackets


Avoiding the anti-malware trap

Anti-virus software is a vital addition to your PC if you want to browse the internet in relative safety. However, anti-malware publishers don’t provide their services simply out of the goodness of their hearts and would ideally like you to subscribe at the highest possible cost.
      Fortunately for your wallet, we have a few tips to keep costs down.
READ THIS REPORT Full story : Expert Reviews


Smart infrastructure plus malware equals disaster

The microprocessor has done much more than fuel IT installations, PCs and laptops, smartphones and tablets. It’s also allowed designers to build intelligence into a wide range of brute-force hardware devices. Modern refrigerators, automobiles, and home thermostats routinely have more MIPS and RAM than my first PC. Microprocessors allow utilities, manufacturers, and municipalities to control networks of smart machines.
      But there’s a downside, too. This year has seen the first major outbreaks of malware against the Internet of things.
READ THIS REPORT Full story : SDTimes.com (blog)


Malware writer claims to hacked Windows 8

According to F-Secure, its researchers have detected one uncommon malware, which has an authorized code-signing certificate belonging to a government institution in Malaysia. Pcworld.com published this on November 14, 2011
      Chief Research Officer Mikko Hypponen at F-Secure said that code-signing certificates, which were actually digital signatures, made sure that an application was authentic and trustworthy for executing it on a PC. Meanwhile, malware frequently provided counterfeit digital certificates that Internet-users got duped with
READ THIS REPORT Full story : Computing


Cloud: money-sucking parasite

Build a cloud computing service based on hardware belonging to other people, but sell it just like any other commercial cloud service.
      Use the same highly distributed approach SETI did in the ’90s and try not to notice the similarity between a legitimate cloud service based on borrowed CPU cycles from privately owned machines, and malware-driven botnets that do the same thing except that they deliver DDOS rather than financial results.
READ THIS REPORT Full story : ITworld.com


How far can foreign hackers go before Pentagon has to blow someone up?

First cyberspace rules of engagement lay out area to be protected, potential for violent countermeasures. The Pentagon put out a report Tuesday that sounds like the worst sort of bureaucratic administrivia, but actually defines the heart of what the military does and how it chooses to do ethically the ugly things it’s required to do — but for cyberspace.
      The U.S. military now has a legal framework to cover offensive operations in cyberspace, the commander of the U.S. Strategic Command said Wednesday, less than a month after terming this a work in progress.
(reuters)
READ THIS REPORT Full story : itworld.com


Android malware explodes, jumps five-fold since July

‘Exponential growth’ driven by Google’s policy of not vetting apps, veteran hackers moving to Android
      Malware targeting Google’s Android mobile operating system exploded in the last several months, its volume quintupling since July, Juniper Networks said … The rash of infected apps aimed at Android owners shows no sign of abating, said Dan Hoffman, Juniper’s chief mobile security analyst and a member of the company’s global threat center.
READ THIS REPORT Full story : Computerworld


DevilRobber now “improved”, still nasty malware threat

TUAW told you about DevilRobber and what sort of unsavory things it can do to (and with) your Mac. (In case you don’t click over to read the article, here’s the scoop: it’s bad. Real bad.) Back in the day (November 1st), it was a Trojan horse and sent a little of your personal info off to some far flung servers.
      But CNet is reporting the new version has mutated, and now it tries to grab your Terminal history and system logs. This new “improved” version can be picked up by downloading Pixelmator from someplace that is not the Mac App Store . . . SEE THE NEXT ARTICLE
READ THIS REPORT Full story : tuaw.com

DevilRobber Trojan now disguised as PixelMator

One of the latest trojan horse malware attempts on OS X is a bitcoin mining and data stealing bot called “DevilRobber” that uses the system’s parallel processing capabilities of systems (the GPU and CPU) to run Bitcoin mining operations to rapidly generate Bitcoins (an experimental digital currency).
      All malware is expected to be altered, refined, and otherwise updated, and recently security firm F-Secure has reported it found another variant of the DevilRobber Trojan roaming around pirated software networks.
READ THIS REPORT Full story : by Topher Kessler — reviews.cnet.com


McAfee Warns Consumers of the “Twelve Scams of Christmas”

‘Tis the season for consumers to spend more time online – shopping for gifts, looking for great holiday deals on new digital gadgets, e-planning family get-togethers and of course, using online or mobile banking to make sure they can afford it all.
      But before logging on from a PC, Mac, or mobile device, consumers should look out for the “12 Scams of Christmas,” the dozen most dangerous online scams this holiday season, revealed today by McAfee.
READ THIS REPORT Full story : www.marketwatch.com


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